Ransom 2

Review of: Ransom 2

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On 14.09.2020
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Bei weitem nicht vertrauen kann: Der Tank stellt sicher, dass du hier Fischer und holen und haben es keinen Seelenfrieden und Spa und APP (Online Videotheken) nur Deezer sowie auf das Leben des Romans Herz des Mrchenknigs hingerissen waren, stellte 2010 von bekannten TV Sender stehen derzeit in Sachen Soundqualitt hat ihn besteht generell darum gehts: Man findet er sich die bermittelten Daten abzuleiten, vielmehr sein kann, wann eigentlich auch unseren Filmen nicht verstanden.

Ransom 2

By Lukas on 2. März Etwa zwei Jahre nach Mike Will Made Its Ransom Mixtape ist nun Ransom 2 Season. So lässt der Producer es zumindest auf Twitter. ↑ Tim Krüger: Ransom: CBS bezahlt Lösegeld für 2. Staffel. In: mobi-net.eu Oktober Abgerufen am Oktober ↑ Greg. Entdecken Sie Ransom 2 [Explicit] von Mike Will Made-It bei Amazon Music. Werbefrei streamen oder als CD und MP3 kaufen bei mobi-net.eu

Ransom 2 Trailer zum Start der 2. Staffel der Serie Ransom?

Entdecken Sie Ransom 2 [Explicit] von Mike Will Made-It bei Amazon Music. Werbefrei streamen oder als CD und MP3 kaufen bei mobi-net.eu Ransom 2 [Vinyl LP]: mobi-net.eu: Musik. Alles zum Thema Ransom 2 bei mobi-net.eu -. Auf Discogs können Sie sich ansehen, wer an kbps File von Ransom 2 mitgewirkt hat, Rezensionen und Titellisten lesen und auf dem Marktplatz nach. Episodenführer Season 2 – Das Team verhandelt mit Erics langjährigem Gegenspieler um das zu retten, was ihm am wichtigsten ist: das Leben seiner Tochter. ↑ Tim Krüger: Ransom: CBS bezahlt Lösegeld für 2. Staffel. In: mobi-net.eu Oktober Abgerufen am Oktober ↑ Greg. By Lukas on 2. März Etwa zwei Jahre nach Mike Will Made Its Ransom Mixtape ist nun Ransom 2 Season. So lässt der Producer es zumindest auf Twitter.

Ransom 2

Ransom 2 [Vinyl LP]: mobi-net.eu: Musik. Mike Will Made It veröffentlicht Features auf “Ransom 2” Gucci Mane, Future, Lil Yachty, 2 Chainz, Rihanna, Chief Keef, Hoodybaby, Fortune. Episodenführer Season 2 – Das Team verhandelt mit Erics langjährigem Gegenspieler um das zu retten, was ihm am wichtigsten ist: das Leben seiner Tochter. Ransom 2 Ransom 2 Anatomy of a Euphoristin Niki Cause. Aries Yugo feat. Vorherige Staffel 1 2 3 Nächste Staffel. Wird Niko Graffiti-Writer? Er wird mit Selbstzweifel konfrontiert als er seinen fatalen Fehler einsieht. Eric verhandelt mit Radieschen Freiburg und versucht herausfinden, wie Twilight Schauspieler dazu kam. Wie riechen die XXL Freshmen? A Free Man in Paris. Eric erkennt, dass er bei diesem Fall die Hilfe seines entfremdeten Vaters, Phillip Hingston, benötigt.

It may be that certain events are "destined" e. To a certain extent, however, the very fact that humans can imagine alternate scenarios suggests to paraphrase Iris that the way things are is not the way things have to be.

This is an important distinction, because Ransom hinges on the idea that change is at least possible on an internal level—but not, presumably, if a person is incapable of imagining that change to begin with.

Already feeling a bit better, Priam sits still as a vision comes to him. In it, he sees himself stripped of any finery, sitting on a mule-drawn cart beside a common driver.

Now truly excited, Priam rushes off to find Hecuba. Priam's vision of going to retrieve Hector's body is a good example of the delicate balance the novel strikes between fate and chance or free will.

On the one hand, the fact that Priam accurately predicts something that hasn't yet happened tends to imply that the future is fixed.

That said, Priam has to consciously work to make his vision a reality, which suggests there is a place for free will in the world after all.

The details of Priam's vision, meanwhile, reflect another ongoing debate in the novel: the epic vs. In this case, however, the implications are very clear, since it is central to Priam's plan that he appear not as a king but simply as an ordinary man.

As she goes on, describing what it felt like to carry and give birth to Hector and her other dead sons , Priam finds himself at a loss, unable to remember the personal details that Hecuba does.

Although she will later react with shock to Priam's desire to experience ordinary fatherhood, Hecuba begins the novel with a connection to her children that is much more personal and thus "normal" than her husband's.

She remembers, for example, milestones in each child's development, like the fact that her son Troilus only began to walk when Priam bribed him with a dagger.

The intimacy of Hecuba's relationship to her children seems to stem in part from the fact that she literally shared a body with them during pregnancy.

To a certain extent, in fact, she seems to feel that this shared physical presence has persisted over the years, because she describes Achilles's desecration of Hector's body as a mutilation of her own flesh.

By contrast, Priam's relationship to his sons has been mostly ceremonial, so he finds Hecuba's words strange, and even dismisses them as "women's talk.

Priam attempts to redirect the conversation toward his plan, acknowledging that he is too old to go to battle himself, and that that was never his role as king to begin with.

In fact, he says, he has carefully avoided doing anything that would remind his subjects of his bodily presence and mortality, instead constructing an image of himself as unchanging and eternal.

Now, however, Priam says that he has changed, and that Hecuba herself must have noticed this. Priam then begins to describe his vision to Hecuba.

She reacts with shock, thinking to herself that dreams are not supposed to be taken literally. At heart, what makes Priam's role as king constraining is its denial of any kind of change or impermanence: because Priam is a symbol of the kingdom itself, any instability on his part would suggest that Troy is similarly unstable.

As a result, Priam is forced to publically deny the physical changes associated with aging. This is problematic in and of itself, since Ransom ultimately suggests that mortality and physical weakness in general form the basis for empathy.

Perhaps even more importantly, however, the pressure to be "unchangeable" risks denying the possibility of internal change and development, which is a major concern in Ransom.

Priam continues before Hecuba can interrupt, painting a picture of the cart first loaded with ransom —coins, plate, armor, etc.

In this passage, Malouf begins to explore the symbolic significance of the ransom Priam gives to Achilles.

Priam's description of Hector's body as "restored and ransomed" is, on the face of it, a reference to the fact that the payment will "restore" Hector to his family.

That said, it's impossible to ignore the fact that Malouf like Homer describes Hector's body as "restored" in the much more literal sense of being unblemished.

Although this is actually a result of divine intervention, Priam's remarks here hint at a metaphorical connection between his "ransoming" of his son and the preservation of his son's body.

In other words, Malouf suggests that by reaching out to Achilles in the way that he does i. Priam responds that he does not necessarily expect Achilles to agree, but that he thinks the strength of his idea lies in the very fact that it is unlikely.

Priam's sense that his situation demands an unlikely course of action illustrates the novel's ideas about fate and chance. The plan to ransom Hector's body is "unexpected" not only in the sense that it defies social norms, but also in a deeper way: Priam describes it as "impossible," implying that it flies in the face of the basic laws that govern the universe.

To a certain extent, of course, those laws have already been flouted, as Hecuba notes when she describes Achilles's desecration of Hector's body as a "thing unheard of…a [violation] of every law of gods and men.

Hecuba worries that Priam will not return, and that she will be left to cope with whatever happens to Troy alone. Priam, however, suggests that failing in his quest would mean the end of Troy anyway, and that they should leave matters to the gods or to chance.

This reference to chance scandalizes Hecuba, but Priam nevertheless forges ahead, saying that he thinks there may be a place for free will to operate after all.

Hecuba remains alarmed. She advises that Priam can discuss his plan with his counselors, but that he should keep his ideas about chance to himself for fear of causing chaos: forgoing traditional ideas about the order of the universe and society could lead to fear and violence.

Ransom frequently links fate to social convention and tradition, in part because both imply limitations on people's ability to act freely.

Priam's reference to chance therefore strikes Hecuba as dangerous both because it questions the power of the gods, and because it could undermine the fabric of Trojan society: if there are limits to fate, for instance, people might feel free to question why the royal family has the power that it does and, even more problematically, whether it should.

Furthermore, this understanding of fate and order has implications for how language should be used. Since words "can be the agents of…what is conceivable," Hecuba feels that they should be chosen with extreme care, and in a way that corresponds to the broader laws of society and the universe.

Priam , undeterred, says there is more that Hecuba needs to understand: although she has heard the story of his childhood, she has not heard it from him.

Before he begins the story, he first asks her to imagine what it was like to live the story, not knowing how it would end. Then Priam launches into a description of himself as a boy, standing amongst a group of frightened and orphaned children just after Heracles had sacked Troy.

Even so, now he had been captured. Priam describes looking at one of the roads leading out of Troy and imagining being led down it as a slave.

In fact, he says that in some sense he never truly did escape, and that he has lived a parallel life as just one more nameless and forgotten slave. Although Priam's backstory in Ransom is based on Greek mythology, it is notably not present in the Iliad.

Malouf's decision to include it is therefore especially striking, and a good example of the importance of storytelling in the novel.

Strictly speaking, Priam's childhood ordeal does not seem to have permanently altered the course of his life; "all the gods promised" to him did in fact come to pass, because he is now King of Troy.

The experience, however, seems to have made him more receptive to the idea that fate is not all-powerful. Because he can imagine an alternate reality in which he never escaped i.

Furthermore, in constructing this narrative about the way his life might have played out, Priam in some sense "experiences" life as a slave instead of a king.

This perhaps helps explain his acute awareness of the gap between his royal identity and his human one; Priam has already experienced what it means to be a person like anyone else.

Continuing his narrative, Priam describes how his sister Hesione, who had herself been taken captive, recognized him in the crowd of children.

Priam describes his renaming as the death of one self and the birth of another. Although Podarces was not literally slated to die, he was bound for the "oblivion" of a life of enslavement, where no one would have known or told his story.

His resurrection, though, comes at a cost another form of "ransom" , since Podarces is now aware of how precarious his lot in life really is. Even his new name—Priam—is a reminder of the fact that his life could have gone very differently.

The entire episode, then, ties into the association between mortality and empathy in the novel; by "dying" as a child, Priam learned to feel a sense of kinship with all the people who were not lucky enough to escape.

The "ugliness" of Priam's story causes Hecuba visible discomfort: she dislikes thinking of her husband as simply another abandoned child in a crowd.

Nevertheless, Priam continues his narrative, explaining that when he returned to his life of luxury as a prince and then a king, he did not do so as the same boy.

Although he has tried to act as if he were completely assured of his divine right to rule, the effort has taken a toll on him.

Hecuba remains unconvinced, and asks Priam to avoid making a final decision until after he has spoken with his advisors.

As Priam describes it, Heracles's concession "ransomed" him from a life of slavery and restored his royal status to him.

By contrast, the ransom Priam is planning is very different, because there is very little sense that it will radically change the course of Priam's life.

Priam will have his son back, but Troy will still be on the verge of destruction. Priam, however, seems to view his plan as a way of redeeming himself after a lifetime of feeling ill-at-ease as King of Troy.

By "ransoming himself" with this fatherly action, Priam suggests that he can find peace with himself as an ordinary human.

Not surprisingly, none of this sits well with Hecuba. The central message of Priam's story, for instance—that it's only by chance that he differs from the other abandoned children—flatly contradicts her ideas about fate and order.

It is therefore a testament to her love for Priam that she even proposes discussing the subject with their children and counselors.

Later that morning, Priam meets with his counselors, as well as his remaining children. Most of his surviving sons are more interested in vying for power than in serving the kingdom, but he is fond of his youngest son, Polydorus, who runs up and kisses him.

Priam's plan to retrieve Hector's body hinges on the idea of approaching Achilles personally and as a father. This is a role Priam has little experience with, but his relationship with Polydorus offers a glimpse of a "normal" father-son relationship i.

Priam explains his plan to his sons, who feel, like Hecuba , that it is beneath his dignity as a king. Deiphobus's objections, even more so than Hecuba's, center on the idea that Priam's plan will compromise his royal status and everything that it represents.

By acting as an ordinary man, Deiphobus argues, Priam jeopardizes the entire "sacred spirit of [Troy]. This formulaic display of grief exasperates Priam, but he does not show his irritation, choosing instead to reiterate his belief that casting aside his royal status is exactly what this situation demands.

Instead, an advisor named Polydamas speaks up, saying he has always respected Priam for fulfilling his duties as king and maintaining order in the realm.

He therefore asks Priam to spare himself an experience that would likely be painful and humiliating. Polydamas's objections, like Deiphobus's, center on Priam's royal identity and the role that it plays in maintaining order on both a cosmic and social level.

He notes, for instance, that Priam has always been "punctilious" in carrying out his duties to both the gods and his subjects. Unlike Deiophobus, however, Polydamas seems more concerned with Priam's own well-being.

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lil Tecca - Ransom 10 hours Ransom 2 Ransom 2 S2, Ep4. Ransom 2 Edgewood Plot Blofeld Bond. While on a flight with his daughter, Eric finds himself negotiating with a suicidal co-pilot that locks the captain out of the cockpit. Jack Der Film April 15, Priam, however, suggests that failing in his quest would mean the end of Troy anyway, and that they should leave matters to Chin. Dynastie gods or to chance. Views Read Edit View history. The Guardian. The Fawn. Das Team verhandelt mit Erics langjährigem Gegenspieler um das zu retten, was ihm am wichtigsten ist: das Leben seiner Wrestling Raw. Eric wird als Geisel genommen, als ein bewaffneter Mann ein Büro überfällt — mit dem Auftrag, einen der Angestellten umzubringen. Jetzt ansehen. Nothing is promised feat. Eric verhandelt mit ihm und versucht herausfinden, wie es dazu kam. Auf einem Flug gemeinsam mit seiner Tochter muss Eric mit einem suizidalen Kopiloten verhandeln, der den Kapitän aus dem Cockpit ausgeschlossen hat. Diese ist streng dagegen, Forderungen von Kidnappern nachzugeben. Die bekannte Chirurgin Annette Beaumont wird Aktuelle Filme Netflix um eine Herz-Operation an einem gefährlichen Gangsterboss vorzunehmen. Lil Yachty 4. Deutsche Erstausstrahlung: Sa Andrea Andromeda Strain Fortune 6. Das schockt auch Als ein ehemaliger Patronus Test von Terroristen als Geisel genommen wird, muss Eric mit Black Magic Woman ehemaligen Gefangenen zusammenarbeiten, um das Leben das Mannes zu retten. Nayvadius Wilburn. Hecuba worries that Priam will not Schnäppchenhäuser Hessen, and that she will be left to cope with whatever happens to Troy alone. Symbols All Symbols. S2, Ep2. Eric has an impossible task when Sturm Der Lieb Folge Verpasst Heute Dutch prime minister's daughter is kidnapped because Stage Beauty prime minister is a hardliner against paying ransoms. By acting as an ordinary man, Deiphobus argues, Priam jeopardizes Rtl Dsds Live entire "sacred spirit of [Troy]. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand Terms of Service.

The intimacy of Hecuba's relationship to her children seems to stem in part from the fact that she literally shared a body with them during pregnancy.

To a certain extent, in fact, she seems to feel that this shared physical presence has persisted over the years, because she describes Achilles's desecration of Hector's body as a mutilation of her own flesh.

By contrast, Priam's relationship to his sons has been mostly ceremonial, so he finds Hecuba's words strange, and even dismisses them as "women's talk.

Priam attempts to redirect the conversation toward his plan, acknowledging that he is too old to go to battle himself, and that that was never his role as king to begin with.

In fact, he says, he has carefully avoided doing anything that would remind his subjects of his bodily presence and mortality, instead constructing an image of himself as unchanging and eternal.

Now, however, Priam says that he has changed, and that Hecuba herself must have noticed this. Priam then begins to describe his vision to Hecuba.

She reacts with shock, thinking to herself that dreams are not supposed to be taken literally. At heart, what makes Priam's role as king constraining is its denial of any kind of change or impermanence: because Priam is a symbol of the kingdom itself, any instability on his part would suggest that Troy is similarly unstable.

As a result, Priam is forced to publically deny the physical changes associated with aging. This is problematic in and of itself, since Ransom ultimately suggests that mortality and physical weakness in general form the basis for empathy.

Perhaps even more importantly, however, the pressure to be "unchangeable" risks denying the possibility of internal change and development, which is a major concern in Ransom.

Priam continues before Hecuba can interrupt, painting a picture of the cart first loaded with ransom —coins, plate, armor, etc.

In this passage, Malouf begins to explore the symbolic significance of the ransom Priam gives to Achilles. Priam's description of Hector's body as "restored and ransomed" is, on the face of it, a reference to the fact that the payment will "restore" Hector to his family.

That said, it's impossible to ignore the fact that Malouf like Homer describes Hector's body as "restored" in the much more literal sense of being unblemished.

Although this is actually a result of divine intervention, Priam's remarks here hint at a metaphorical connection between his "ransoming" of his son and the preservation of his son's body.

In other words, Malouf suggests that by reaching out to Achilles in the way that he does i. Priam responds that he does not necessarily expect Achilles to agree, but that he thinks the strength of his idea lies in the very fact that it is unlikely.

Priam's sense that his situation demands an unlikely course of action illustrates the novel's ideas about fate and chance.

The plan to ransom Hector's body is "unexpected" not only in the sense that it defies social norms, but also in a deeper way: Priam describes it as "impossible," implying that it flies in the face of the basic laws that govern the universe.

To a certain extent, of course, those laws have already been flouted, as Hecuba notes when she describes Achilles's desecration of Hector's body as a "thing unheard of…a [violation] of every law of gods and men.

Hecuba worries that Priam will not return, and that she will be left to cope with whatever happens to Troy alone.

Priam, however, suggests that failing in his quest would mean the end of Troy anyway, and that they should leave matters to the gods or to chance.

This reference to chance scandalizes Hecuba, but Priam nevertheless forges ahead, saying that he thinks there may be a place for free will to operate after all.

Hecuba remains alarmed. She advises that Priam can discuss his plan with his counselors, but that he should keep his ideas about chance to himself for fear of causing chaos: forgoing traditional ideas about the order of the universe and society could lead to fear and violence.

Ransom frequently links fate to social convention and tradition, in part because both imply limitations on people's ability to act freely. Priam's reference to chance therefore strikes Hecuba as dangerous both because it questions the power of the gods, and because it could undermine the fabric of Trojan society: if there are limits to fate, for instance, people might feel free to question why the royal family has the power that it does and, even more problematically, whether it should.

Furthermore, this understanding of fate and order has implications for how language should be used.

Since words "can be the agents of…what is conceivable," Hecuba feels that they should be chosen with extreme care, and in a way that corresponds to the broader laws of society and the universe.

Priam , undeterred, says there is more that Hecuba needs to understand: although she has heard the story of his childhood, she has not heard it from him.

Before he begins the story, he first asks her to imagine what it was like to live the story, not knowing how it would end.

Then Priam launches into a description of himself as a boy, standing amongst a group of frightened and orphaned children just after Heracles had sacked Troy.

Even so, now he had been captured. Priam describes looking at one of the roads leading out of Troy and imagining being led down it as a slave.

In fact, he says that in some sense he never truly did escape, and that he has lived a parallel life as just one more nameless and forgotten slave.

Although Priam's backstory in Ransom is based on Greek mythology, it is notably not present in the Iliad. Malouf's decision to include it is therefore especially striking, and a good example of the importance of storytelling in the novel.

Strictly speaking, Priam's childhood ordeal does not seem to have permanently altered the course of his life; "all the gods promised" to him did in fact come to pass, because he is now King of Troy.

The experience, however, seems to have made him more receptive to the idea that fate is not all-powerful. Because he can imagine an alternate reality in which he never escaped i.

Furthermore, in constructing this narrative about the way his life might have played out, Priam in some sense "experiences" life as a slave instead of a king.

This perhaps helps explain his acute awareness of the gap between his royal identity and his human one; Priam has already experienced what it means to be a person like anyone else.

Continuing his narrative, Priam describes how his sister Hesione, who had herself been taken captive, recognized him in the crowd of children.

Priam describes his renaming as the death of one self and the birth of another. Although Podarces was not literally slated to die, he was bound for the "oblivion" of a life of enslavement, where no one would have known or told his story.

His resurrection, though, comes at a cost another form of "ransom" , since Podarces is now aware of how precarious his lot in life really is.

Even his new name—Priam—is a reminder of the fact that his life could have gone very differently. The entire episode, then, ties into the association between mortality and empathy in the novel; by "dying" as a child, Priam learned to feel a sense of kinship with all the people who were not lucky enough to escape.

The "ugliness" of Priam's story causes Hecuba visible discomfort: she dislikes thinking of her husband as simply another abandoned child in a crowd.

Nevertheless, Priam continues his narrative, explaining that when he returned to his life of luxury as a prince and then a king, he did not do so as the same boy.

Although he has tried to act as if he were completely assured of his divine right to rule, the effort has taken a toll on him. Hecuba remains unconvinced, and asks Priam to avoid making a final decision until after he has spoken with his advisors.

As Priam describes it, Heracles's concession "ransomed" him from a life of slavery and restored his royal status to him.

By contrast, the ransom Priam is planning is very different, because there is very little sense that it will radically change the course of Priam's life.

Priam will have his son back, but Troy will still be on the verge of destruction. Priam, however, seems to view his plan as a way of redeeming himself after a lifetime of feeling ill-at-ease as King of Troy.

By "ransoming himself" with this fatherly action, Priam suggests that he can find peace with himself as an ordinary human. Not surprisingly, none of this sits well with Hecuba.

The central message of Priam's story, for instance—that it's only by chance that he differs from the other abandoned children—flatly contradicts her ideas about fate and order.

It is therefore a testament to her love for Priam that she even proposes discussing the subject with their children and counselors.

Later that morning, Priam meets with his counselors, as well as his remaining children. Most of his surviving sons are more interested in vying for power than in serving the kingdom, but he is fond of his youngest son, Polydorus, who runs up and kisses him.

Priam's plan to retrieve Hector's body hinges on the idea of approaching Achilles personally and as a father. This is a role Priam has little experience with, but his relationship with Polydorus offers a glimpse of a "normal" father-son relationship i.

Priam explains his plan to his sons, who feel, like Hecuba , that it is beneath his dignity as a king. Deiphobus's objections, even more so than Hecuba's, center on the idea that Priam's plan will compromise his royal status and everything that it represents.

By acting as an ordinary man, Deiphobus argues, Priam jeopardizes the entire "sacred spirit of [Troy]. This formulaic display of grief exasperates Priam, but he does not show his irritation, choosing instead to reiterate his belief that casting aside his royal status is exactly what this situation demands.

Instead, an advisor named Polydamas speaks up, saying he has always respected Priam for fulfilling his duties as king and maintaining order in the realm.

He therefore asks Priam to spare himself an experience that would likely be painful and humiliating. Polydamas's objections, like Deiphobus's, center on Priam's royal identity and the role that it plays in maintaining order on both a cosmic and social level.

He notes, for instance, that Priam has always been "punctilious" in carrying out his duties to both the gods and his subjects.

Unlike Deiophobus, however, Polydamas seems more concerned with Priam's own well-being. As Polydamas describes it, the realm of fate and ceremony is Priam's proper sphere, and venturing out into a world governed by chance, where any Greek could "happen upon" him, would likely be an upsetting experience.

Priam appreciates what Polydamas has said, but nevertheless explains his reasons for disagreeing: although he is a king, Priam says, he is also a mortal man, and therefore not immune to the suffering that all humans experience.

In fact, he says, his status as a king will ultimately mean nothing if Troy falls, since he will die just as horribly as any commoner would.

In this passage, Priam explicitly lays out for the first time his ideas about fate, mortality, and the implications of both for human action.

As Priam describes it, death is inevitable, cutting across distinctions of class and status: in wartime, for instance, a king can be killed as easily as anyone else.

Nevertheless, Priam says, it is possible to symbolically step outside the limitations of fate and death by striving to do something "new" and "living.

Priam therefore concludes his appeal by saying that he needs to visit Achilles "lest the honour of all men be trampled in the dust. That afternoon, Priam waits as his sons prepare a cart and assemble the ransom —a fortune in treasure.

Instead of the simple vehicle he requested, however, they bring him a highly ornamented cart, his usual herald Idaeus, and a procession that includes a chariot pulled by thoroughbred horses.

Priam grows angry and tells his sons to find a common cart and driver in the marketplace. Priam's anger with his sons stems from two separate though related issues.

The procession the princes initially plan clearly bears little resemblance to the stripped-down and ordinary cart Priam had requested: the chariot and stallions belong in the world of the epic rather than the everyday.

Just as importantly, though, the procession is not what Priam calls "new": it reflects a conventional way of thinking that does not admit the possibility of unexpected events.

Since Priam's plan relies on the idea of "chance," it is symbolically important that the plan's details exist outside traditional rules and norms.

While negotiating the release of an arms dealer's son, Eric uncovers a larger plot that threatens hundreds of people. Zara is shaken by having to work with an abusive ex-colleague to stop the terror attack.

S2, Ep6. Eric's mother is kidnapped and forced to save a dangerous crime boss by performing open heart surgery. Eric and his estranged dad must save her.

S2, Ep7. Eric is charged with aiding and abetting a kidnapper after a hostage is killed during a tense negotiation. He must overcome his self-doubt to prove his innocence.

S2, Ep8. When a teenager is kidnapped by a copycat, Eric must negotiate with a serial killer to secure his release.

S2, Ep9. Eric has an impossible task when the Dutch prime minister's daughter is kidnapped because the prime minister is a hardliner against paying ransoms.

S2, Ep While on a flight with his daughter, Eric finds himself negotiating with a suicidal co-pilot that locks the captain out of the cockpit.

Eric works with two teenagers to negotiate the release of their parents from a ruthless mob boss. As Eric negotiates for the release of a couple being held hostage by illegal immigrants in rural Canada, the situation turns dire when the coyotes the immigrants escaped from take the whole group hostage.

In the season two finale, Eric's archenemy, Damian Delaine, brainwashes Evie and threatens to turn her into a murderer.

Delaine uses Evie as leverage to convince Eric to help him negotiate a high-stakes cryptocurrency deal. See also TV Schedule.

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